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Triang flying scotsman

Discussion in 'Model Railways' started by Mervyn brace, Jul 30, 2020.

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  1. Mervyn brace

    Mervyn brace New Member

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    High I have a triang model flying scotsman circa 1960s all working well apart from the fact wheels keep locking up I can not seem to get the Set up correct under stand either side is different does any one know a simple way to do this many thanks merv
     
  2. misspentyouth62

    misspentyouth62 Member

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    Hi Mervyn, welcome to NP.
    I'm not familiar with the old Triang models to recall whether left and right hand motion is offset by 180 degrees or otherwise.
    When you say the wheels lock up, there could be many reasons but are you suggesting that a wheel has moved on it's axle to lock up the rods / motion on one side?
    In simple terms, the loco needs to run smoothly with coupling rods only and each wheel 'quartered' the same, before offering the connecting rods and remaining motion. I'm not sure how easy it is to disassemble, correct and then reassemble?
     
  3. RLinkinS

    RLinkinS Member

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    The crank pins must not be at 180 degrees or the engine will lock up. They are normally at 90 degrees, i.e quartered. This is different for 3 cylinder loco but I am pretty sure Triang models will be set at 90. A little more or less will not matter as long as they are the same. Try taking off the coupling rod on one side and then seei if it lines up with the crank pin holes. Also make sure that none of the wheels are loose on the axles

    Sent from my SM-A105FN using Tapatalk
     
  4. Mervyn brace

    Mervyn brace New Member

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    Thanks will give it a go next week and let you no how I get on
     
  5. Steve B

    Steve B Member

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    My first thought was to check the quartering, as has been already mentioned. Triang wheels do sometimes slip if oil has contaminated the plastic insulating bush between the wheel and axle, or if they've been removed and the bush worn or damaged when replacing. However, it could also be worth exploring other alternatives. I expect that you have checked that none of the motion is bent, or that there haven't been previous repairs that haven't worked, like a coupling rod pin that's too long and fouling the chassis behind the wheels. Another thing to check would be to see if the gears are damaged (or worn if plastic is involved), or got something stuck between the teeth. Do things lock up if the motor is removed, leaving the gears disengaged? if so the problem isn't the gears.

    Steve B
     
  6. MG 7305

    MG 7305 New Member

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  7. Mervyn brace

    Mervyn brace New Member

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    Thanks for the input without Steve engine runs fine without rods fitted but seems I am still not getting the quartering right as keeps binding can’t see any kind of marks with witch to start setting the wheels for each side
     
  8. Steve B

    Steve B Member

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    I've had similar problems with more modern models and I suspect that Triang's more robust construction may actually be easier than some of my "rescue projects" from various scrapboxes. If it helps what I do is this: (at your own risk!)
    On a Triang chassis have a look to see which side of the chassis the wheels have the insulating bushes - these make the wheels on this side easier to move on the axles. Remove the coupling rods etc from the insulated side and then with the coupling rod fitted on the non-insulated side turn the wheels until the rod is either at the very top or bottom. this will help to keep the wheels on that side properly aligned. Then on the insulated side see if the crankpin holes all line up with each other and the centres of the axles. They should all be in a straight line and more or less at 90 degrees to the other side If one or more of them of them is misaligned then move the wheel carefully to line up.
    It may be easier to do that by carefully sliding the wheel off the axle at least a bit to release it, BUT if you have to do that, you have to avoid getting the wheel at an angle to the axle which might damage the plastic bush leaving a wobbly wheel at the end of the day. I sometimes find a way of supporting the chassis either side of the wheel set, removing the coupling rod from the other side, and then with a suitable size nail and a light hammer gently tap the axle out of the insulated wheel pushing the axle into the chassis. Don't try that with a plastic chassis!
    Then replace the rod on the non-insulated side and line things up again, and line up the insulated side pressing any wheels you've had to release back on a bit at a time checking the alignment regularly. Try to avoid putting it on crookedly - you want the Flying Scotsman, not a drunken sailor! All the Triang axles I've seen have a shoulder on them which sets the correct gauge, but don't press the wheel on too violently in case you damage the plastic bush. If you need to check the wheels are to the correct gauge, check them against another set of wheels from the loco. Triang had different wheel standards to other manufacturers, and also changed over the years...
    Then refit the coupling rod and try it out. Here's hoping!
    (and don't blame me...!)

    Steve B
     

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