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Tornado

Discussion in 'Steam Traction' started by Leander's Shovel, Oct 20, 2007.

  1. weltrol

    weltrol Member Friend

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    Thrashing was a part of most public schools...
     
  2. LMS2968

    LMS2968 Part of the furniture

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    When I clicked 'like' for the above, it referred to the comment, not the thrashing . . .
     
  3. Sheff

    Sheff Well-Known Member

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    .... and my state grammar


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  4. Jamessquared

    Jamessquared Nat Pres stalwart

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    I don't know what the highest authenticated speed behind a Schools was (high nineties mph seems to ring a bell); I've got little doubt that 100mph would have been possible under the right conditions, but I suspect timers of the day probably had to be a little circumspect in releasing logs that were considerably over the nominal line limit, particularly in earlier days. You get the sense that flashy feats of high speed probably weren't of much interest to REL Maunsell, but might perhaps have been seen more favourably by OVSB. The kind of thing where you suspect a driver suspected of running very fast might have been summonsed for a "please explain" to the CME for 30 seconds followed by a long and friendly chat about what the control settings were, how the loco rode, whether they could maintain pressure and water level etc!

    Tom
     
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  5. John Petley

    John Petley Well-Known Member

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    According to the Bluebell Railway's website, it was 95mph at Wool with the loco being 928.
     
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  6. Bikermike

    Bikermike Member

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    Sorry yes, I wasn't meaning to imply the he got the Schools to the ton, but every description of a run with a Schools involves it being run very hard indeed.
     
  7. sir gilbert claughton

    sir gilbert claughton Member

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    i don't think so .
    92158 (iirc) achieved 90 mph on the GN line , which prompted an article in the TI about high speeds with small drivers .
    BR management swiftly followed that with a speed limit for the nines
     
  8. LMS2968

    LMS2968 Part of the furniture

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    And, I believe, instructions issued that they should not be used on express passenger work. And then sent them to the S&DJR specifically for such work, although few runs over that line at 90 mph have been recorded!
     
  9. MellishR

    MellishR Part of the furniture Friend

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    Could any train on the S&DJR properly be called "express"? What was the line limit?
     
  10. std tank

    std tank Member

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    The Pines.
     
  11. Jamessquared

    Jamessquared Nat Pres stalwart

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    @torgormaig is really the person to ask, but I think the real advantage of the 9F on the S&DJR is that they could take even the heaviest passenger trains unaided, which was potentially a cost saving - sadly seemingly largely unrealised due to stubborn management who didn’t seem massively interested.

    Tom
     
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  12. torgormaig

    torgormaig Part of the furniture Friend

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    Officially the line limit was 70 mph but there were not too many places where this was attainable. While it is true that stubbon management were reluctant to see the potential of the 9Fs on the S&D it is also true that, according to Peter Smith, the unions were also unenthusiastic about them, especially at Templecombe, where they feared the loss of pilot work.

    Peter
     
  13. Hirn

    Hirn New Member

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    With a racing car at the time of Gresley's serious streamlining a useful speed improvement was achieved by streamlining the underneath.
    A sheet underneath the chassis above the road surface. (I think the sheet was aluminium and the car an Alta - but definitely in Britain.)
    Not that much of a timer but I would thoroughly agree - rather concerned that the result of the 75 mph limit, and its increasingly strict enforcement, is that locomotives are
    ruthlessly flogged up banks which would would not be necessary if they were allowed to run faster downhill which they comfortably could.

    NB The present 75 mph speed limit is practically the same speed as the French 125 kph.
     
  14. Victor

    Victor Part of the furniture Friend

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    And mine, more than once.:Arghh: All I wanted to do was to get out of the place, I later realised I'd wasted my opportunity.:(
     
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  15. guycarr360

    guycarr360 Member

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    And all this has nothing to do with 60163?????
     
  16. sir gilbert claughton

    sir gilbert claughton Member

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    .................................which is a technique practised by GWR crews on top link work, and the practice on BR testing .ie. constant steam rate
     
  17. MellishR

    MellishR Part of the furniture Friend

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    To what extent is the 75 mph limit (and lower limits for steam locos with smaller wheels) based on engineering and to what extent on "wet finger in the air"? One obvious engineering consideration is hammer blow, but that would imply that speed limits should take account of the number of cylinders and the balancing, rather than only the driving wheel diameter.
     
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  18. class8mikado

    class8mikado Member

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    Am i not right in thinking that a new set of standards for max permitted speed was recently introduced ( might even be on this thread somewhere) that takes exactly these kind of factors into consideration ? think that there was some hoohaa because it suggested that some machines were to be dropped a bracket due to age/ stroke length or some such....
     
  19. Will RL

    Will RL Member

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    [​IMG]

    Taken from a Steam Railway Mag early last year.

    You’re right in there being some some discrepancies. Buck managed to overturn the speed restriction on his B1 which is again registered to 75mph. Keeping the post relevant and Tornado maintains its 90mph certificate. Riley’s 5’s have managed to take advantage of the 65 limit whereas others and Halls have yet to climb higher AFAIK.
    To run above 75mph has been said to require hard wired lights and mk2 stock.
     
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  20. gricerdon

    gricerdon Member

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    And mine but on hands only. I put the Headmaster’s bike in the pond!
     

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