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The Yorkshireman 04/06/2016

Discussion in 'What's Going On' started by leander, May 30, 2016.

  1. jma1009

    jma1009 Well-Known Member

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    The whistle is overblowing ie jumping an octave as can be heard in the above clip twice at the end.

    This suggests the whistle valve has been opened out too big (perhaps a previous alteration for the previous chime whistle that requires more steam), or the 'new' (allegedly original) whistle is simple badly adjusted re the 'bell' and languid disc.

    However if the 'new' (original) whistle was for the original 180psi boiler, it is hardly surprising it will now 'overblow' and jump an octave.

    Cheers,
    Julian
     
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  2. David likes trains

    David likes trains Well-Known Member

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    Wow, just look at all those people on the wrong side of the fence! :mad:

    Have to assume it's 'normal' people who are ignorant of the rules of the railway, as we aren't seeing any mass trespass on other steam tours at the moment. I went to near Frisby on the Wreake today, thought it might be a quiet spot but a small crowd of the local population showed up - all on the right side of the fence.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. peckett

    peckett Member

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    There is a much more simple explanation ,that is condensed steam i.e. water ,entering the whistle. Pipes from boiler/whistle valve to whistle are usually long enough for steam to condense in.
     
  4. peckett

    peckett Member

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    20mph permanent restriction on the embankment off the north end of Welland Viaduct Harringworth .Been like it for years and years. The embankment was rebuilt about five wears ago but restriction still applied after.
     
  5. guycarr360

    guycarr360 Well-Known Member

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    Shock Horror, plenty more trespass darn sarf, with 60103, never saw that happening.....

    Like bees round a honeypot, much more and she will be on a plinth in York..
     
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  6. Where's Mazeppa?

    Where's Mazeppa? Member

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    Hardly surprising that two leading NatPres contributors have almost immediately taken issue with the validity of this comparison. Personally, I think that its high time that we started to view the exploits of the Blinkered One in a far more positive light. And to view the length of time that it took to execute its London-York itinerary through an entirely different prism that shuns a “one-for-the-record books” tag. So this is what I’ve come up with.

    Back in 1676 a ne’er-do-well with highwayman leanings by the name of John “Swift Nick” Nevison accomplished what was for the time something of a Blue Riband London-York performance when, having committed a felony at Gad’s Hill, in Kent, around 3am/4am, he rode to York to establish an alibi (which he subsequently exploited to good effect) by attending a bowls match at which the Lord Mayor of York was present, arriving at the venue the same evening at around 8pm. With his steed running without blinkers or nameplates, and routed via Chelmsford, Cambridge, Huntingdon and the Great North Road, the journey time has been variously estimated at around 15/16 hours.

    Not bad, you might say, but not a patch on the running of the Blinkered One last Saturday because, whichever way you look at it, it accomplished its journey in only just over half the time that it took “Swift Nick” to do the same. Not a fair comparison?? Well, on the one hand its certainly true that three and a half centuries have elapsed since Nevison’s legendary run. And the un-named steed didn’t benefit from any suspicion of any kind of shoveage at any point on its run. But in all fairness, Nevison only had to cross the Thames once (by ferry) whereas the Blinkered One had to do this twice in its circumnavigation of territory south of the Thames. And it had to pass through more counties on its way north!

    I know that there are some who might not be very comfortable with this kind of comparison; indeed, there have been a number of attempts to debunk the Nevison legend by challenging his water stop strategy and claiming that the feed-water rate needed to support the performance of his bay mare would have required more and longer stops than would have been feasible within the overall timescale of his journey. Hmmm, you could almost detect the hand of a NatPres contributor in this kind of debate. Or certainly someone who might want to claim that this was an exaggerated performance on Nevison’s part.

    But I for one am quite prepared to believe the legend. And for me the fact that Neverson was really “going for it” makes it a legitimate to compare the performance of the two quite obviously thoroughbred beasts. And this, in turn, makes the Blinkered One a wholly worthy hands-down winner.

    So lets have no more spurious comparisons with Tornado/ ECML transit times. Lets be positive. This machine is a winner!! And here is the proof. Twice as fast as a bay mare over a 200 mile course!!

    So there. All further comment is superfluous!!;);)
     
  7. Big Al

    Big Al Nat Pres stalwart Staff Member Moderator

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    Well, Flying Scotsman holds a number of notable records and there's plenty of evidence that the loco is continuing to do so. On the Victoria - York run, we know that par for the course on this complex route is about 7+ hours and it is only a trip that can be done one way with steam for that reason. But the extended journey of 8 hr 35 min on 4/6 will probably never be beaten. A rather more uncomfortable record is the fact that with a handful of exceptions, the locomotive is currently spending most of its time on steam charters with a diesel for company. It would be too depressing to look at the data but I would venture to suggest that nothing comes close, not even Tangmere.

    If that's the price to pay for having FS back on the main line then it's arguably a good deal. Personally, I think it's sad and perhaps we should look forward to when things have quietened down a bit and, for example, UKRT gets the opportunity to run a few trips with her.
     
    Where's Mazeppa? likes this.
  8. TH Railway Videos

    TH Railway Videos New Member

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    Driver only pulled the whislte half way down to get it just right
     

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