If you register, you can do a lot more. And become an active part of our growing community. You'll have access to hidden forums, and enjoy the ability of replying and starting conversations.

The Vale of Rheidol Railway - News

Discussion in 'Narrow Gauge Railways' started by ValeOfRheidol, Nov 12, 2014.

  1. 30854

    30854 Resident of Nat Pres

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2017
    Messages:
    11,287
    Likes Received:
    10,749
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Brighton&Hove
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    Sure, but it was the smoothness of the machine at line speed which stood out to me. Here's the clip [12'41"] in question. Have a look .... do you agree, or am I just imagining it?

     
  2. pete12000

    pete12000 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2006
    Messages:
    853
    Likes Received:
    210
    Is the online loco roster usually accurate? I'd like to visit when the Garrett's working in August..
     
  3. 30854

    30854 Resident of Nat Pres

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2017
    Messages:
    11,287
    Likes Received:
    10,749
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Brighton&Hove
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    Safest reply has to be to get in touch with your preferred visiting dates:
    Phone: 01970 625819
    Email: info@rheidolrailway.co.uk

    You do know we're keen on piccies? ..... lots and lots of lovely piccies. :)
     
    pete12000 likes this.
  4. LNERandBR

    LNERandBR New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2011
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    18
    My understanding is there are two brake coaches and the brake van. One Brake Coach now has the First Class upgrade done and the second is in the works. Until that one is done the second passenger set is using the brake van.

    I think they are currently using every available carriage to provide the two train service. IMO they could do with more so as to provide spares for high season and extra capacity for Gala events.
     
    30854 likes this.
  5. Nigel Day

    Nigel Day Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2015
    Messages:
    257
    Likes Received:
    660
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Steam loco engineer
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    In South African ACR an NGG 16 would be rated at 260 tones of wood on a harder line and run at a slower speed. What they’ve been asked to do in the UK is fast running at a small load. The Vof R is under using the power of a 16 and even a 2-6-2 is not stretched as hard as a Welshpool loco. So both VoR types are performing well within their capabilities.
     
    andrewshimmin and 30854 like this.
  6. 30854

    30854 Resident of Nat Pres

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2017
    Messages:
    11,287
    Likes Received:
    10,749
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Brighton&Hove
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    An awkward sod points out: No.60 is an NGG13 (one of three in the UK) .... though putting photos up alongside an NGG16 would make for a great 'spot the difference' contest.
     
  7. bantamd14

    bantamd14 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    68
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Stafford
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    Likewise putting different makers of NGG16s would make for another great 'spot the difference' contest!
     
    30854 likes this.
  8. Hunslet589

    Hunslet589 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2017
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    199
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Oxfordshire
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    The building of the NGG13s and 16s is a tale of incremental changes between successive batches and deciding where one class ends and the other begins is rather arbitrary. The first batch of what would eventually be called NGG16s ran for a while with numberplate marked up as NGG13 before being redesignated. The change that triggered the reclassifation is reported to be the fitting of a different pony truck and the addition of roller bearings to same. Not a particularly obvious change externally.

    There were several other changes between batches of both classes as the design was 'tweaked' in the light of experience over time. Some were obvious (e.g. cab size) others where not (e.g. brake arrangements). A side-by-side comparison between batches within a class will probably show up just as many detail differences as between a 13 and a 16!
     
    andrewshimmin and 30854 like this.
  9. Nigel Day

    Nigel Day Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2015
    Messages:
    257
    Likes Received:
    660
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Steam loco engineer
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    All the manufacturers engines where mixed and matched in SA as needed. The basic dimensions etc are basically the same. Yes the pony trucks went roller bearing and the reason for changing classification. So defining the difference between them is hard and purely in some parts just the boiler cradle being true to its number.
     
  10. 45669

    45669 Part of the furniture

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2006
    Messages:
    2,668
    Likes Received:
    940
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Farnborough
    Evening All,

    While I was on holiday in Wales I also visited the Vale of Rheidol Railway:





    Hope you like 'em.

    TTFN,

    Ron.
     
    kscanes, ragl, Crawley Ben and 2 others like this.
  11. 45669

    45669 Part of the furniture

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2006
    Messages:
    2,668
    Likes Received:
    940
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Farnborough
    I certainly never expected to see a Garratt on the V of R, but I did; and here's part two of my video footage:



    Further instalments to follow as time permits...

    TTFN,

    Ron.
     
    clam1952 likes this.
  12. lynbarn

    lynbarn Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2006
    Messages:
    836
    Likes Received:
    205
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Working in the NHS as a Maintenance Electrician
    Location:
    Kent
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    Just looking at Google maps I can't see any advantage of extending the line to anywhere, I could be wrong, but if it is so easy why didn't the Western or BR think about doing so?
     
  13. 30854

    30854 Resident of Nat Pres

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2017
    Messages:
    11,287
    Likes Received:
    10,749
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Brighton&Hove
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    The original company had designs on a line to Aberaeron, a coastal village south of Aberystwyth. That's the 'what', although the 'why' has always rather escaped me!

    If memory serves, it was to have been 16 miles long and actually got as far as being put out to tender before the Cambrian pounced. Whether it was that event, or original contractor (and major shareholder) Pethicks squashing the extension, no more was heard of the matter, or other aspirations to electrify the line. Beyond that, I've no detailed info.
     
    lynbarn likes this.
  14. 35B

    35B Nat Pres stalwart

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2011
    Messages:
    20,408
    Likes Received:
    16,468
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Grantham
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    I suspect given the period, belief that building a railway between two linked places was a good thing and to the benefit of both - even if the railway would be terminally insolvent. We are after all in the aftermath of the Light Railway Act, and the many and various oddities that it spawned, some of which even were given birth to.
     
  15. 30854

    30854 Resident of Nat Pres

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2017
    Messages:
    11,287
    Likes Received:
    10,749
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Brighton&Hove
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    I assume the line would've traversed the (nearly a coastal) shelf to the west of a marked rise in land levels. Such a route must have called for at least five river crossings. Google Earth reveals the sparsity of population ... and I don't think the charming rows of mobile homes in several parks would have blighted the coast existed before WWI.

    Given that the village of Aberaeron ("town" really would be stretching it) comprises a very few streets either side of the Afon Aeron at the junction of (what are now known as) the A482 (which approaches from the SE) and A487 (at this point, the coast road, further north, the companion of the Corris between Mach and just above Maespoeth), it has to be said, although the tidal portion of the river acts as a fairly restricted harbour for small vessels (the basin on the North bank, within the village couldn't have handled anything of consequence after the demise of commercial sailing vessels) it can't have been seen as highly desirable, even at the height of the railway age.

    The VoR had a branch connecting it to the more substantial harbour at Aberystwyth, for all the traffic that ever generated. Pretty much moribund by grouping, after withdrawal of Bagnall 2-4-0T No.3 (GWR 1198) around that time meant the annual requirement of running a 'train' along the branch to preserve right-of-way was reduced to a wagon shove in either direction. With it being almost certain there'd be a lot of accumulated detritus to remove from the rails, I find myself wondering whether that near pointless ritual was seen as some strange "punishment duty" or some early "team building exercise" ? Whatever, it most certainly isn't indicative of any more significant traffic to or from the harbour at Aberaeron.

    Unless there was some untapped mineral vein I'm unaware of, or the locale was/is massively more bountiful than anywhere else between the heaving fleshpots of Aberystwyth and Aberteifi, the only thing which makes any sense of so large and frankly questionable an outlay would have been if there had been some grand scheme to develop the village, likely for tourism. Maybe I'm missing something which would've made what looks like a surefire way of bankrupting the line.
     
    ilvaporista and Bluenosejohn like this.
  16. 35B

    35B Nat Pres stalwart

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2011
    Messages:
    20,408
    Likes Received:
    16,468
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Grantham
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    I quite agree - the one time I’ve driven that way suggested no plausible traffic flows. But that didn’t stop promoters promoting schemes in the 19th century, despite their obvious lack of potential - and the aftermath of the 1896 Act saw a final flourishing of doomed proposals.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
    Paul42, 30854 and Mrcow like this.
  17. 30854

    30854 Resident of Nat Pres

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2017
    Messages:
    11,287
    Likes Received:
    10,749
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Brighton&Hove
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    One can only presume the railway's promoters didn't quite get the drift of the old maxim about how to end up with a small fortune from their scheme! :)
     
  18. 35B

    35B Nat Pres stalwart

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2011
    Messages:
    20,408
    Likes Received:
    16,468
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Grantham
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    They were in a long line...
     
    30854 likes this.
  19. Steve B

    Steve B Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2008
    Messages:
    1,910
    Likes Received:
    1,307
    Location:
    Shropshire
    Of course in the fulness of time there was a standard gauge line to Aberaeron (branching of from the line between Aberystwyth and Camarthen), which in spite of the sparseness of the population in the area made a bit more sense than an extension of the VOR, being a through route with the branch tapping into a small but significant populated area.

    We should also remember that South West Wales did have some mineral wealth, in addition to agriculture and fishing. And poor roads at the time - prior to the railways it was horse and cart, or by sea.

    Steve B
     
    Bluenosejohn and 30854 like this.
  20. Maldwyn

    Maldwyn New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2014
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    25
    Gender:
    Male
    Posting duplicated and deleted (see below)
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2022 at 10:46 PM

Share This Page