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Rolling stock, restoration and new build projects

Discussion in 'Heritage Rolling Stock' started by 240P15, Jan 25, 2018.

  1. Sawdust

    Sawdust Member

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    When removing old screws, carefully clean the head and slot with a mallet and screwdriver. Try and tighten the screw first. Apply pressure gradually and waggle the screw back and forth. Make sure your screwdriver has a nice square tip, if the end is worn and rounded, you will damage the head beyond any hope of getting it out.

    Finally if you can, use a micro blow torch to heat the head of the screw, that little bit of expansion can break the rust holding it in the wood. Alternatively an old fashioned copper soldering iron can be used to heat the screw where you want to keep scorching to a minimum. You can also heat rusted nails and pins this way, it won't work for every one, but will help you pull some out without snapping. ( Do keep some water handy to avoid starting fires).

    Sawdust.
     
  2. Sawdust

    Sawdust Member

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    This project deserves it's own thread.

    Sawdust.
     
  3. 4950

    4950 New Member

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    I think a lot of the hints and tips in here deserve their own thread too; very interesting and instructive.
     
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  4. huochemi

    huochemi Well-Known Member Friend

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    Thanks. Why do you use lard rather than tallow, which was the traditional cabinet makers lubricant (and still available from hardware merchants)? I guess Vaseline tends to soak into the wood to the detriment of paint application?
     
  5. toplight

    toplight Active Member Account Suspended

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    It shouldn't make any difference, lard or tallow, you are using it to lubricate the screw going into the wood. It probably reduces the rusting a bit too if it is a steel screw
    I just checked Tallow is Sheep or Beef fat. Lard is Pig fat, but for what we using it for makes no difference. You can buy a block of lard from the supermarket for about 35p whereas if something is marketed as traditional cabinet makers tallow they probably will charge more.
    I don't use it all the time, but it is useful particularly either for big screws, or small brass ones which because they are softer they sheer off more easily.
     
  6. GWR Man.

    GWR Man. Well-Known Member

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    Washing up liquid dose the same for making screws going in and also if using brass screws use a steel screw to cut the thread into the wood to make the brass screws go in more easy so less chance of snapping them off and having a damaged screw head on show as well.

    Yes a how too topic should be created and pined, so things like to links how to use a band saw correctly can be given.
     
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  7. toplight

    toplight Active Member Account Suspended

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    Another tips I have picked up regarding sanding/fitting

    1 A lot of railways use pad sanders, often 1/4 or 1/3 pad sanders and whilst they are okay I find they are very slow and not that effective. I bought a random orbital sander a few years ago and they are much quicker and better especially if you want to take more off.

    2 You can also use fibre pads and a fibre backing plate in an angle grinder, they are quite useful if you want to remove a lot, and shape something

    3 I was recently made some wooden pattresses for the lights, I routered the edge and was getting them round in a pillar drill with sandpaper. It was pointed out that after you have finished sanding you can use some wire wool and it finished them off nicely, so I use the wire wool now.

    4 When you are trying to make something fit, for example a door is sticking somewhere when it closes, often you can't see exactly where, so you can use chalk to chalk the edge of door and when it closes, anywhere it is touching it will leave a chalk impression on the other part, so it helps you see where to remove material or adjust etc.
    Any wooden parts you fit together you can chalk them like this to see where they are touching and where they aren't. You file/sand the bits that are touching showed by the chalk then chalk again and try again and that way you gradually can get it to perfectly fit.
     
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  8. Sawdust

    Sawdust Member

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    People should get proper one on one tution for using woodworking machines.

    Sawdust.
     
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  9. flying scotsman123

    flying scotsman123 Part of the furniture

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    Agreed, but a thread for tips such as the ones toplight is giving would be great. Most of the ones in toplight's post above I was aware of, but all the tips for putting screws in are completely new to me (as you'd expect, I don't do that too often!)
     
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  10. nick813

    nick813 Active Member Loco Owner

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    Using stainless steel screws requires a harden/stainless screw bit for any electric/hand/air driver.
    the B&Q etc do not work and bend the bit.
     
  11. K14

    K14 Member

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    Indeed. Stanley 'Yankee' bits have always worked for me in that context, the older the better (provided they've not been abused & burnt on a bench grinder).

    For chisels too, seek out old 'uns. Car boots, Vintage Rallies, & even Ebay. Ones marked with a WD arrow are highly desirable, as are pre-war Marples. Modern stuff is utter rubbish by comparison.

    Same goes for hand planes. I picked up two Stanley Compass planes off the 'bay some years back for (I think) £40 & £20. The more expensive one was missing a non-essential handle & the cheap one was a ball of rust that took two weeks of WD40-ing to free up. The £40 one dates to 1903, & the cheapo a bit later - but the blade is stamped A (crown) M, so probably saw action on SE5A's & Sopwith Camels. Both blades will take an edge you can shave with & plane endgrain on a 6" curve with almost no tear-out.

    Find the tatty ones - the collectors want shiny things to put in their display cabinets & get 'excited' over, so those can get bid up to silly levels.

    Pete S.
     
  12. Sawdust

    Sawdust Member

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    Use cabinet screwdrivers (the ones with a slightly squashed round knob handle), avoid ridged plastic handles which will rip your palm to bits after a few screws.

    I have to agree with Pete, modern steel is rubbish for keeping an edge. I tend to grind my chisels and blades a bit shallower then the recommended angle. A cheap diamond whetstone can be quite good for reviving the underside of chisels and blades, which have a little rust pitting or have been badly sharpened (underside is no longer flat).

    For saws though I go modern mostly using Stanley Fatmax fine cut saws, which are much sharper than I can file my old Tyzack's saws.

    Sawdust.
     
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  13. flying scotsman123

    flying scotsman123 Part of the furniture

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    Indeed, I was most surprised when our woodworking team declined two good quality hand planes a couple of years ago, said they only wanted modern ones! Suggested I sold them on eBay, blow that, they're Grandad's and Great Grandad's, they're sat on a shelf at home - They were useful in making OO gauge railway platforms but that's been about it for me!
     
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  14. toplight

    toplight Active Member Account Suspended

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    An old plane if sharp and adjusted properly can be used perfectly okay. Also if you are doing a lot of planing like say roof boards, then it is worth getting an electric planer.

    I would recommend these planes too ( I don't have either, I just borrow them from someone else when I need them) but I see there is plenty on ebay.

    rabbit plane, I think number Stanley 78 , the blade can be moved to the front or middle and goes up to the edges so useful for some jobs.

    [​IMG]

    and a small one like this (useful for small stuff like mouldings etc)

    upload_2018-1-30_22-54-7.png
     
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  15. 30854

    30854 Part of the furniture

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    No disagreement about modern 'tool steel' - 99% of which is utter crap! I'm lucky ..... London Road Market down here contains a unit selling all manner of old tools, bits and clamps etc. ..... there's a damned fine (proper) bacon outlet there too!

    Good for bacon butties and quality vice ...... what's not to like? ;)
     
  16. michaelh

    michaelh Part of the furniture

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    The crap modern steel was probably made in China
     
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  17. Copper-capped

    Copper-capped Active Member

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    The idea of the modern 'throw away' hand saw annoys me but you can't argue - they are hard to beat.
     
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  18. StoneRoad

    StoneRoad Active Member

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    All these tips are fascinating ... although, I have used sash cramps as well as wedges for tightening up roof planks when doing the first fit (on the four wheelers for the Knotty we painted the planks before finally fitting them - it gives a nicer finish, in my opinion).
    [​IMG]
    NSR 127 - finished roof
    par StoneRoad2013, on ipernity

    I spend quite a lot of time hunting for old tools, especially the small and specialised "Stanley" planes ... so much so that one gentleman at a local antiques fair keeps them for me, which uses up my "pocket money" on many visits.
    I also have a wooden try plane which gets used sometimes, it belonged to my grandfather and has his name stamp.
     
  19. Graham Phillips

    Graham Phillips New Member

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    I was always warned not to use washing up liquid as a lubricant for fitting motorbike tyres as it contains salt which will rust the rim and spokes
     
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  20. toplight

    toplight Active Member Account Suspended

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    Thought I would bring this thread back as started putting some external paint on my own project so thought you might like to see some pictures. The ceilings/lights have progressed too. (see earlier in the thread for previous pictures), I just painted one of the panels today so the paint was still wet in the photo.(see last picture)
    DSCF7009.JPG
    DSCF6999.JPG
    DSCF7007.JPG
    DSCF7011.JPG
    DSCF7013.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2018
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