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Mystery Boiler

Discussion in 'Steam Traction' started by ghost, Feb 11, 2019.

  1. ghost

    ghost Well-Known Member

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    A mystery boiler has been found in Omagh (N.Ireland) near the old station site.

    Can anyone see any obvious clues as to its origins?

    Judging by the width across the firebox compared to the blue door, the firebox must be around the 3 foot mark (which might fit with it being from an Irish narrow gauge loco). It could also have come from a traction engine/road roller stationary engine or indeed have been a steam supply boiler for a building in the area.

    Curious/possible identifiable items are; the flange on the outer firebox crown, the missing dome, another flange beyond the dome and what looks like a cut out for a chimney at the far end. It's hard to tell from the photo, but there does not appear to be any mountings for fittings on the backhead.

    51753222_2097689426963102_688150230079635456_o.jpg
    Thanks in advance

    Keith
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
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  2. 30854

    30854 Part of the furniture

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    Mmmm ..... my first thought was "C&L 4-4-0t", the last locos of which (other than survivors Nos.2L, 3L and 5T) seem to have been cut up on site, rather than sent to Inchicore for scrapping. Unless the Ulster BP 2-4-0t's were very different from the IMR edition, those could safely be ruled out. The proportions look wrong for any of the 2-6-0t's or owt bigger. I've never seen a Clogher Valley loco undressed, so can't completely rule those out.

    Sounds like one for @Avonside2 who's probably forgotten more about Irish NG than I've ever known!
     
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  3. marshall5

    marshall5 Well-Known Member

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    It is certainly not from a traction engine, roller, or portable engine as the boiler has no hornplates (to support a crankshaft). It could be a portable or semi-portable boiler if there are brackets just above the foundation ring (not visible in the photo) to secure an axle. Rather than the remains of a dome I'm seeing a manhole as it appears to curve around the boiler barrel. A dome flange would be flat and have a ring of stud holes around it. I believe what you have is a small industrial boiler.
    Ray.
     
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  4. ghost

    ghost Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for your comments 30584. I doubt the C&L locos would have been moved to Omagh for scrapping - as you say, much more likely to have been scrapped on site. I think the arrangement is wrong for a CVR loco, but I stand to be corrected on that.

    Thanks Ray. I didn't think it was a traction engine, roller or portable, but I wanted to put it out there as I'm certainly no expert in that field! Thanks for your explanation and conclusion.

    Keith
     
  5. Steve

    Steve Part of the furniture Friend

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    I agree that the large opening in the top is a man hole. The two other orifices are probably safety valve base and crown valve base. With all the mud it is difficult to make out any other stabbings but there does look to be holes for a gauge glass on the backhead. What would be the smokebox on a loco boiler appears to simply be an extension of the barrel with a riveted lap joint, which is definitely not loco practice. Industrial boilers without a strong blast don't require any smokebox with volume as there is little carry over. No sign of any openings for boiler feed but these could well be on the side that we can't see.
     
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  6. Avonside2

    Avonside2 New Member

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  7. Avonside2

    Avonside2 New Member

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    Hi Here is the Boiler From Omagh , I went and seen it monday week ago. It was Found over 20 ft Buried under the Ground , near the old GNR Station site,
    its said there was an old Creamery there. they are going the Contractors to Sand Blast the Boiler and Fly Wheel and Cylinder Found.
    Its it a Stationary Boiler the size of a Small 2ft Gauge Loco. And Mount it somewhere Locality .
    20190211_172033.jpg 20190211_172021.jpg 20190211_172403.jpg 20190211_172419.jpg 20190211_172346.jpg 20190211_172551.jpg FB_IMG_1549973765276.jpg
    ,
     
  8. Avonside2

    Avonside2 New Member

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