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Grantham Canal - bits of rusty metal and other interesting stuff.

Discussion in 'Everything Else Heritage' started by baldbof, Oct 5, 2015.

  1. ilvaporista

    ilvaporista Part of the furniture

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    Good old Blaster Bates, He went to the same school as my mother, my father used him every so often to blow up stubborn things on his construction projects. Dad said that when he came in to the office to talk about a job, work would stop as he raccounted his tales... Then there was the pub lunch.....
     
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  2. DismalChips

    DismalChips Member

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    I'm quite surprised to learn he was an actual person who really did blow things up. I assumed a sort of Fred Dibnah spoof character.
     
  3. Forest Rail

    Forest Rail New Member

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    Staying sort of on track he does a fun tale about nearly blowing up a canal boat near a council salt depot...
     
  4. gwilialan

    gwilialan Part of the furniture

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    If you don't mind a little bit of 'language' then I'd recommend having a listen. Working in the days before any real H&S and showing some wonderful contempt for pompous authority (e.g. On the phone... "We should be able to let you blow up the chimney next Wednesday.." "Oh - hold on a minute..." Bang - rumble "Did you hear that?" "Yes I did, What was that?" , "Chimney just fell down... must have been the high winds...!")

    Some wonderful tales there.
     
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  5. ilvaporista

    ilvaporista Part of the furniture

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    Dad always tells the tale that when they were clearing some of the trees from what became the M6 through Cheshire they negotiated with another contractor a price per tree with an extra for stumps as they were more difficult. Come the day to start work they find that the trees have become stumps overnight and the cost of the job has rocketed up. In comes Mr Bates and the only thing that rocketed were the stumps and Dad got a bollocking from the CRE as they'd had a complaint of noise from the local Lord.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2020
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  6. ilvaporista

    ilvaporista Part of the furniture

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  7. Groks212

    Groks212 Member

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    There is also a book of his stories which is worth a read, if you can find it.


    book images.jpg

    Dave B
     
  8. baldbof

    baldbof Part of the furniture Friend

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    Another landmark day with some material being removed from the upper dam to allow the water to seep gently through and return to the lock entrance. The upper dam will remain in place as access to the towpath side is still required for the construction of the upper mooring wharf ( for which we are still awaiting the piling sheets.) after which it will be removed entirely. The water has caused the gates to close and, with the paddles, are making a good seal as witnessed by the absence of any depth of water in the lock chamber itself.

    re-watering.png

    scaffolding gone.png

    Eventually, the water will rise to the level of the new by-wash and drain through to the lower pound. The lower dam will remain in place (possibly with a drainage channel cut into it) to allow access to Lock 13 when we start on that phase - access to the off-side of Lock 13 is severely limited by the presence of the lock cottage's garden; the lock cottage itself is currently being restored by the occupant.

    Meanwhile, work is continuing in tidying up the fencing on the access track and the unused materials which are being held for use on Lock 13.
     
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  9. baldbof

    baldbof Part of the furniture Friend

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    A couple of photos from today's team to compare with yesterday's view; the forebay and the lock now looking how they should be - full of water. Don't that look grand? :)

    full forebay.png

    full lock.png
     
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  10. Thompson1706

    Thompson1706 Well-Known Member

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    I can remember standing about six feet away from him when he demolished the coaling plant at Birkenhead Mollington Street. This was November 1968.
    He told us to lean against the wagons behind us as the blast would push us backwards.
    No health and safety cordon those days.

    Bob.
     
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  11. ilvaporista

    ilvaporista Part of the furniture

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    What a sight. Well done to all of the team involved and so good to see another lock in water.
     
  12. baldbof

    baldbof Part of the furniture Friend

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    This photo taken today by Bob T (one of the Thursday team) from the lower dam showing Lock 14's lower pound now restored to water. What a sight; just needs a boat to complete the scene.
    L14 lower pound.png
     
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  13. baldbof

    baldbof Part of the furniture Friend

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    Some more recent photos taken by other volunteers - I'm still grounded by order of the quack.

    The gate anchors have had molten lead poured in order to seal them into the anchor stones. Note the join in the anchor stone - this was because the quarry couldn't produce a one-piece anchor stone.


    leading.png


    A safety grill has been installed over the entrance to the new by-wash - can't have little Johnny going exploring.

    inlet.png

    At the other end of the new bywash, proof that it works.

    outflow.png

    More work to do!! The piling sheets for the upper mooring wharf have finally arrived.

    pilings.png

    Elsewhere on the site, work continues to re-distribute muck, clarts and dirt that was excavated during the early phase of the restoration. I believe the term is "making good".
     
  14. Ploughman

    Ploughman Well-Known Member

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  15. Wenlock

    Wenlock Member Friend

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  16. tor-cyan

    tor-cyan Member

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  17. baldbof

    baldbof Part of the furniture Friend

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    Five minute job!! ;)

    No thanks. We've still got 25+ miles to go with ours. We have some more projects starting soon - restoring the slipway at our depot and raising an outflow so we can increase the depth of water in the top pound, then there's tackling the trees that have grown in the dry section near Kinoulton/Cropwell Bishop. Funding bids for the repair of the next two locks (12 & 13) have been submitted and we're already getting kit sorted for that phase plus the on-going job of maintaining the current navigable length. There are times when we just wish there were 9 days in a week.
     

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