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Engines of War: what steam locos changed WW2?

Discussion in 'Steam Traction' started by S.A.C. Martin, Mar 7, 2018.

  1. Copper-capped

    Copper-capped Well-Known Member

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    A bit of a bump, but here is a bit of footage showing a restored example of a USATC S118 that we got from America to help with our war effort:



    I like ours better than your S160 btw! ;)
     
  2. class8mikado

    class8mikado Member

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    Agreed, not enough Mikados in this country, but in this case not enough 3ft/metre gauge track either...
     
  3. Copper-capped

    Copper-capped Well-Known Member

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    3'6" in this case ;)
     
  4. Ploughman

    Ploughman Well-Known Member

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    I think you need a visit from a tamper.:)
     
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  5. ross

    ross Well-Known Member

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    Isn't it extraordinary that Australians, a people on the whole quite like ourselves, can be trusted to ride on open verandas without falling off, whilst we Brits have to locked inside railway carriages, preferably with the windows shut, in case we accidentally reach out and twist the doorhandle, then absent-mindedly open said door and fall....
     
  6. Eightpot

    Eightpot Well-Known Member Friend

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    At least three Dean Goods remained in East Germany post 1945. One, WD185 ended up in the area covered by Reichsbahn Direction (RBD) Erfurt, and another , WD200 ended up in RBD Dresden. A third, WD155 was at Magerviehof in East Berlin as late as February 1953. It is presumed that all were subsequently scrapped there at some time afterwards.

    I've seen somewhere that two or three Jintys were returned post-war to the LMS/BR, but one, WD8, ended up in Reichsbahn Ausbesserungs Werk (RAW = Overhaul Workshops) Tempelhof in West Berlin as late as October 1953, again, presumably scrapped there some time after. This loco had a brake examination at RAW Cottbus on May 15th, 1944 - I wonder if it caused some comments there along the lines of "With locomotives like this do the British really think they can win?"
     
  7. Eightpot

    Eightpot Well-Known Member Friend

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    Ditto on the German narrow gauge lines for veranda riding.
     
  8. ross

    ross Well-Known Member

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  9. Copper-capped

    Copper-capped Well-Known Member

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    It would be interesting to see if the nanny state (something we are not immune from), would bring down its full weight following a serious incident in this regard. Let's hope it doesn't happen.

    A recent outing of mine; no window hanging policy - this became increasingly relaxed as the tour went on and I imagine stewards were able to judge the level risk/stupidity of the passengers! Window hanging was actively encouraged at one stage in our carraige to take advantage of a photo opportunity and with knowledge that the line side had recenly been cleared. Single track all the way too. Only two people per verandah at any one time - my son zoned out for the best part of an hour or so just staring down at the track whizzing past while I as getting peppered with smut! Good times. :)
     
  10. Forestpines

    Forestpines Well-Known Member

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    Or, indeed, the various British lines that permit veranda riding albeit at 25mph

    Edit: does the RHDR still permit people to travel with doors fully open?
     
  11. Ploughman

    Ploughman Well-Known Member

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    Can they also bring their own AA Guns?
     
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  12. Forestpines

    Forestpines Well-Known Member

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    I was thinking more of when I travelled on it in the 1980s, in summer, and nearly every carriage door (sliding) would be fully open. However they did do a replica armoured train a few years ago, so it might be worth asking...
     
  13. Ploughman

    Ploughman Well-Known Member

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    I rode the Ravenglass line last year and the open carriages are exactly that, open and no doors.
     
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  14. Reading General

    Reading General Well-Known Member

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    Welshpool and Llanfair unmissable for precisely that.
     
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  15. Spamcan81

    Spamcan81 Nat Pres stalwart

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    Agreed. Signs used to say that riding on the balcony was prohibited but nobody took any notice and the railways never enforced it anyway. I've even managed to ride on the verandah of the guard's brake when that's next to the loco. A polite request has never been refused. Quite novel to be trundling along on the veranda whilst chatting to the crew of a Saxon-Meyer. :)
     
  16. andykeithharris

    andykeithharris New Member

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    Yes they do. I was down there a couple of weeks ago on a hot day and most doors were open. In fact if I remember rightly the open carriages don't even have doors. No chains either

    Andy
     
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  17. peckett

    peckett Member

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    I was at the gcr Saturday' the have a Mk1 named Cromwell car converted to a veranda car. See photo is quicker than me try to explain
     

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  18. Sorry - late to this thread, but I just wanted to say that...
    My grandfather was a carpenter on the line between Charing Cross / Cannon Street and Sevenoaks during the war. It was his job to work on temporary repairs just like this...
    ... in the London area throughout the war, including throughout the Blitz, frequently while air raids were going on. As 30854 says...
    It is to my eternal regret that he died at the young age of 72, when I was only 4, so I hardly knew him.
    Sorry but this made me chuckle. Coming from one of the worst offenders on the entire forum! ;-)
     
  19. But the Typhoon and Tempest won D-Day and the march across Europe (with a bit of help from Bomber Command and the USAAF)
    (Sorry, having an SACM parochial moment on my particular aviation hobby horse :) )
     
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