If you register, you can do a lot more. And become an active part of our growing community. You'll have access to hidden forums, and enjoy the ability of replying and starting conversations.

Embankments

Discussion in 'Civil Engineering M.I.C.' started by pseudonym, Oct 22, 2007.

  1. hassell_a

    hassell_a Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2006
    Messages:
    737
    Likes Received:
    2
    To my knowledge, only 2 of the SVR repairs use gabions - Folly Point above and below the formation, and at the embankment feet at Borle Viaduct, - which is the one that you mention above.

    The problem at Borle, was that the initial plan of shotcreting wasn't possible during the winter months due to the high water levels.

    Most other repair sites on the SVR were done using soil nailing (Northwood), ground pinning with capping beams (Sterns, Oldbury Viaduct) or using rolled stone, which was built up in successive layers (Victoria Bridge, Fishermans Crossing, Highley, north of Hampton Loade).
     
  2. Ploughman

    Ploughman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2008
    Messages:
    2,297
    Likes Received:
    340
    "Anyone who wants to see what settlement can do, then just go to Anglesey and travel the A55."

    You could also sample the roller coaster ride at Southport along the northern section of the coast road.
    The tarmac is allegedly 1.5 metres thick in places.
    That is what happens when you build on top of a council rubbish tip.
     
  3. Sponge Cake

    Sponge Cake New Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    I'm a cake, its that simple.
    Location:
    Bakers shop window
    personally i dont like gabions.
    yes they are a quick solotion to a problem but the dont have much of a design life.
     
  4. boldford

    boldford Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Messages:
    436
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gabions or any other form of repair, I hope that those applied to the SVR hold as the monsoon season seems to have arrived. [-o<
     
  5. olly5764

    olly5764 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    Messages:
    1,531
    Likes Received:
    279
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Engineer
    Location:
    Normally in a brake van somewhere
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    I'll second that Brian, according to the weather forcasst, our new culverts are going to be well tested tonight too.
     
  6. Mark Calvert

    Mark Calvert New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2014
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Civil Engineer - Building Roads
    Location:
    Leeds
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    Gabions can have a very long design life, 100+ years. Commonly specified as a 40 year design life. The manner in which they are placed should mean that if one fails, they will not all fall down as it is common practice to lay them in a patter similar to bricks and blocks. The steel work is usually galvanised or similar protecting it and making it durable for many years to come.
     
  7. Jack Enright

    Jack Enright New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2010
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    184
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Buxton, Derbyshire
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    Tenterden Bank on the KESR was originally built of ash and clinker, and was constantly undermined by rabbits. One winter (I think a good 20 years ago), their P-Way team dug the whole lot out, and rebuilt it with layers of mine waste lashed into position with sheets of nylon-coated steel mesh.

    The rabbits never came back, and - as far as I know - the new embankment has been perfectly stable ever since, even under the regular onslaught of very short wheelbase Austerity 0-6-0s and Yankee Tanks slogging uphill with five Mk.Is and a van in tow!

    Jack E.
     
    Wenlock likes this.

Share This Page