If you register, you can do a lot more. And become an active part of our growing community. You'll have access to hidden forums, and enjoy the ability of replying and starting conversations.

West Somerset Railway General Discussion

Discussion in 'Heritage Railways & Centres in the UK' started by gwr4090, Nov 15, 2007.

  1. gwilialan

    gwilialan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2012
    Messages:
    1,552
    Likes Received:
    3,723
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Out there somewhere
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    I guess with the length of the place names and therefore the size of the running in boards there has to be a fair length of line to fit them all in... :D

    OK - I'll fetch me coat...:)
     
    Copper-capped likes this.
  2. RailWest

    RailWest Part of the furniture

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Messages:
    3,158
    Likes Received:
    5,696
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    West Country
    Good to see from the web that the PDG has met again recently.

    However I'm puzzled by various mentions in the DRAFT Minutes to the 'Steam Heritage Trust' - who are they ? :) Hopefully the 'Secretariat' will get those corrected before formal publication <hint>.
     
  3. mdewell

    mdewell Well-Known Member Friend

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Messages:
    1,227
    Likes Received:
    1,738
    Occupation:
    UK & Ireland Heritage Railways Webmaster
    Location:
    Essex
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    Another good reason to only use the tank wagon to top up the onboard tanks (even if that is only possible in one direction, that should be enough.)
     
  4. Steve

    Steve Resident of Nat Pres Friend

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Messages:
    11,062
    Likes Received:
    8,360
    Occupation:
    Gentleman of leisure, nowadays
    Location:
    Near Leeds
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    All this is very hypothetical and stems from a comment made that 419 probably didn't have the water capacity to do a full line trip and someone else suggesting a water tanker. If the loco hasn't enough to do the line trip, using the tanker in one direction wouldn't be sufficient and it would have to be attached to the tanker for the whole time. As you wouldn't want to propel the tanker that would involve additional pipework and shut off valves. It would also require running round it as well as the train, which would be a tad complicated with just a simple loop. Not impossible, though.
     
    Fixit likes this.
  5. Steve B

    Steve B Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2008
    Messages:
    1,911
    Likes Received:
    1,310
    Location:
    Shropshire
    All this talk of water tanks etc is all very interesting, but, as has been mentioned, hypothetical.
    As @SebWelsh has said, it's also irrelevant!

    Steve B
     
  6. 30854

    30854 Resident of Nat Pres

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2017
    Messages:
    11,316
    Likes Received:
    10,779
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Brighton&Hove
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    Since when has that ever stopped anyone? ;)
     
    MellishR, Steve B, 35B and 2 others like this.
  7. 5944

    5944 Resident of Nat Pres

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2006
    Messages:
    6,829
    Likes Received:
    5,011
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Train Maintainer for GTR at Hornsey
    Location:
    Letchworth
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    What livery is this hypothetical tanker meant to be in? ;)
     
  8. flying scotsman123

    flying scotsman123 Resident of Nat Pres

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2013
    Messages:
    10,009
    Likes Received:
    16,433
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Cheltenham
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    [​IMG] :)
     
  9. 61624

    61624 Part of the furniture

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2006
    Messages:
    4,626
    Likes Received:
    2,755
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    I think it is meant to be in "Pratt's Motor Spirit" livery - Pratt's became part of Esso ca. 1935 according to various internet sources. I don't know if they had tank wagons, though. Perhaps this one at Didcot is in a fictitious livery.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Paulthehitch

    Paulthehitch Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2020
    Messages:
    909
    Likes Received:
    975
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Hayling Island
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    It was marketed as ''Pratts Perfection'' at one time..
     
  11. staffordian

    staffordian Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    1,430
    Likes Received:
    2,017
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    The Potteries
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    Yes, definitely. I had an early twentieth century road map published by (or sponsored by) Pratts Perfection Motor Spirit.

    It was fascinating to see the early road network, and many pages were devoted to gradient profiles.

    Clearly as important for early motor vehicles as it still is on the iron road...
     
  12. 30854

    30854 Resident of Nat Pres

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2017
    Messages:
    11,316
    Likes Received:
    10,779
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Brighton&Hove
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    Ever come across the palaver involved in coaxing a Ford "Model T" up a steep hill? It needed to be accomplished in reverse gear .... I kid you not!
     
    The Dainton Banker likes this.
  13. staffordian

    staffordian Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    1,430
    Likes Received:
    2,017
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    The Potteries
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    Never seen it, but heard of it. No fuel pump, just gravity feed from tank to carburettor, and tank could be lower than the carb on a steep hill :)
     
    Paulthehitch likes this.
  14. Paulthehitch

    Paulthehitch Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2020
    Messages:
    909
    Likes Received:
    975
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Hayling Island
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    Also the ability to stop when descending hills was a bit important! It is arguable the advent of pneumatic tyres and servo brakes on buses presaged the decline of rural branches
     
  15. 30854

    30854 Resident of Nat Pres

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2017
    Messages:
    11,316
    Likes Received:
    10,779
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Brighton&Hove
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    Just yesterday, I was watching a clip on the evolution of the bus, from horse drawn days through to about 2000. The bit about the rise and fall of 'charabancs' was pretty leftfield.

    I've books containing old photos of a couple ex-Corris alongside Llyn Myngul (Talyllyn Lake) before the first war. Quite how those contraptions, in the days of solid tyres, managed on the hilly (pre-tarmac?) roads in that area back then would be interesting to learn. Let's just say I'm guessing those in the cheaper seats got to enjoy a bit of unexpected exercise!
     
    staffordian and Paulthehitch like this.
  16. Steve B

    Steve B Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2008
    Messages:
    1,911
    Likes Received:
    1,310
    Location:
    Shropshire
    When I was in college I shared a house with someone who used a 1924 Lagonda (one of the smaller ones) as his day to day transport and that also needed to reverse up some hills for the same reason, particularly if the fuel level was low. Getting traction was also a problem, but putting passengers in the dickie seat at the back helped, not only in getting the power down (not that there was much of that), but also in stopping the thing as it was rear brakes only. Living in mountainous North Wales there were some "interesting" moments...

    Steve B
     
    D1039, 30854 and staffordian like this.
  17. D1039

    D1039 Part of the furniture

    Joined:
    May 25, 2007
    Messages:
    3,802
    Likes Received:
    2,607
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    North Somerset
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    Makes sense, I'd thought that it was because the gearing was lower in reverse.

    An 'early cars climbing hills as a spectacle' diversion for you, Betjeman describes in 'Before MCMXIV' in Summoned by Bells:

    "Once a Delaunay-Belleville crawling up
    West Hill in bottom gear made such a noise
    As drew me from my dream-world out to watch
    That early motor-car attempt the steep…"

    Velo gives West Hill in Highgate an average gradient 5.1% and a maximum 8.2%. Yet ~15 years later Model T's had to reverse.
     
  18. 68923

    68923 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2013
    Messages:
    387
    Likes Received:
    245
    Gender:
    Male
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    No I do not currently volunteer
    As a young child (1950's) a "day out" often involved a trip to Sutton Bank in North Yorkshire on the A170. The road has a steepest gradient of 25%, which I think is 1 in 4 in old money, and a hairpin bend. The highlight was watching many a car coming up in reverse, and others giving up halfway if attempting the climb normally. To this day towed caravans are banned from this route.
    Apologies for being a long way from West Somerset!
     
    62440 likes this.
  19. Steve B

    Steve B Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2008
    Messages:
    1,911
    Likes Received:
    1,310
    Location:
    Shropshire
    Not so different from Lynton/Lynmouth - there, almost back on topic...

    Steve B
     
    The Dainton Banker likes this.
  20. Pete Thornhill

    Pete Thornhill Resident of Nat Pres Staff Member Administrator Moderator Friend

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    Messages:
    6,722
    Likes Received:
    4,404
    For comparison to a model T I recently did Porlock Hill in my MK2 Focus ST for the first time (every other time I’ve taken our more modern Zafria). I was impressed to discover the ST will easily climb it in 3rd gear, even on the hairpin. Mind you being a 5 cylinder 2.5l turbo might of helped!!! Certainly didn’t need to reverse up it lol!!!
     

Share This Page