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Bridge plate identity

Discussion in 'Railwayana' started by Romsey, Jan 11, 2023.

  1. 35B

    35B Nat Pres stalwart

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    My understanding is that numbered items like bridges are by line, not company. So there may be bridge 21 near Harringay, but also a bridge 21 on the Skegness line,and another on the Honington Junction to Lincoln, and so on.


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  2. Mandator

    Mandator Part of the furniture

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    I image the numbering was by line and a throw back from original companies but to complicate matters did some companies ie GER perhaps re-number bridges as they absorbed/took over some of the smaller companies early on?
    It appears some companies had some high numbers, eg. The GER & NER as plates in the 1000 crop up!

    I think there is a tome out there but whether it goes into detail, not sure?

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  3. Ploughman

    Ploughman Part of the furniture

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    Ideally you need to find a copy of A Line Diagram for that specific line.
    If it was a North Eastern Railway line I could probably supply you with the detail required, but as it is a GNR Line sorry no can do.
    Line Diagrams are generally an internal document produced for planning of engineering works but occasionally copies come on the market.
    They are similar to Land Plans or Signalling diagrams but the scale and detail are different.

    Maybe worth trying the Great Northern Society.
     
  4. Mandator

    Mandator Part of the furniture

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    Thanks for the info.
    It is not that I am interested in the location as such. It's more a curiosity as to the manner in which Railways implemented bridge numbering.
    I have a number of bridgeplates, mainly LMS bought cheap and requiring welding repairs, but several fellow enthusiasts tend to ask me my opinions as I used to be more heavily involved in collecting!
    Bridgeplates were never my thing - Running in Boards now that is another matter - big though they are!
    I started collecting them as a teenager from CC cos they were cheap and no-one else touched them.
    Used to carry them home on the Underground and Train much to other passengers bemusement!:)
     
  5. henrynoon

    henrynoon New Member

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    Although they are similar in that they both had double borders they are quite different if placed side by side.

    The GNR used both single and double border ones and the latter aren't replacements. I believe the single border ones are later and were perpetuated by the LNER and BR

    There were various differences in full stops and casting codes as per the attached photo IMG_9047.jpg
     

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