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TS Dover.

Discussion in 'Everything else Heritage' started by 45669, Sep 27, 2010.

  1. weltrol

    weltrol Active Member

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  2. MarkinDurham

    MarkinDurham Well-Known Member

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    And that, ladies and gentlemen, is that.

    <<Neil Etherington, Able UK's business development director, said: "I know it has an emotional attachment, but it's never going to float again and it's attracted negative media attention and not helped the profile of the town.

    "It's almost nine years to the day that it arrived for what was supposed to be two weeks. Now 469 weeks later, we've started to dismantle it.

    "It has taken up valuable quay space and we have received no payments for its storage."

    Mr Etherington said the total cost of dismantling the boat will be "in excess of £1m" with Middlesbrough Council paying just over £400,000 and the remainder being met by Able UK.>>

    Able UK have been badly 'burnt' by this. As for dismantling costs - even in death, ships cost a lot. How much extra is down to the asbestos issue, I suspect we won't ever know, but it will likely be a large wedge of cash. And, of course, the hull will either have to be pumped out to move her, or simply broken up where she lies, although the latter is a big and hazardous job in itself. I suspect that it will be mainly the former, but first much of the superstructure can be cut away, then the hull can be made watertight and pumped dry, so that it can be towed across the river to Able's yard, where the last rites can be administered.

    It will be interesting to see how it proceeds.
     
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  3. 60017

    60017 Part of the furniture Friend

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    Relieved to hear this. Nothing worse for a seafarer or maritime enthusiast than seeing a fine old ship left broken and rotting away :Sorry:
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2018 at 4:51 PM
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  4. nine elms fan

    nine elms fan Active Member

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    Always a sad time when a ship that has given so much service is broken up, I remember staying in Saltash in the late 70s and watching HMS Eagle leaving Plymouth for the last time being towed to Scotland for scrapping, it bought tears to my eyes.
     
  5. MarkinDurham

    MarkinDurham Well-Known Member

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    Two ships that I served in on many occasions in the Nineties and Noughties have recently gone to Alang - one of them 'hit the beach' at the end of June last year at the age of 35; the other arrived off there only a couple of days ago; she was 29.

    However, at least they'll get quick deaths; the poor old Dover has been lingering since 2011, when she was sunk at her moorings.
     
  6. toplight

    toplight Member

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    It is very sad to see these ships going for scrap but I don't think it is that feasible keeping them unless they can be kept in use. The costs are just too high. Even trying to run it as a nightclub seems to have failed long term.
    If being used like the Waverley then you can charge passengers to travel on it and this pays the bills, but even with Waverley it still seems tough for them and they often have to find extra funds particularly for repair work.

    A car ferry is also not going to excite anyone as much as say a military ship or Paddle Steamer. I wonder whether HMS Belfast covers its running costs or if there is continual injection of funds from the Imperial War Museum. ?
     

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