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Steam+Electric S&DR 1925 Cavalcade

Discussion in 'The Big Four (1923-48)' started by neildimmer, Nov 30, 2016.

  1. neildimmer

    neildimmer Part of the furniture

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    Raven NER Electric 2-Co-2 Class EE1 Locomotive No. 13 hauled by 1163 T.W. Worsdell J71 (NER Class E) 0-6-0 T at the S&DR Centenary Cavalcade which was held on 2nd July, 1925

    https://railway-photography.smugmug.com/E2/Other-Electrics/Raven-NER-Electric-2-Co-2/i-qMZ836H

    [​IMG]
    Sir Vincent Raven was a great believer in the electrification of main lines. After the success of the Shildon-Newport electrification, he planned to electrify the North Eastern Railway's (NER) stretch of the East Coast main line from York to Newcastle. As

    railway-photography.smugmug.com
    railway photographs from the last 100 years





    Neil
     
  2. DisusedBranch

    DisusedBranch Active Member

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    These locos are preserved? Where??
     
  3. neildimmer

    neildimmer Part of the furniture

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    Who said they were preserved, I didn't

    Neil
     
  4. neildimmer

    neildimmer Part of the furniture

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    I have added a photo of the sole LNER Garrat class U1 2395 on display at the S&DR exhibition in July 1925



    This lone engine (No. 2395) was built by Beyer, Peacock. The frames were laid on 1st June 1925, and was delivered to the LNER on the 21st, ready to be displayed in shop grey at the Stockton & Darlington Centenary celebrations on 1st July 1925. After the celebrations it was painted in black, and entered service in August 1925.

    No. 2395 was the only Garratt ever to serve with the LNER. It was the first mainline Garratt to enter service in Britain, and it was the most powerful British locomotive of any type.

    No. 2395's prime duty was to bank coal trains up the Worsborough Incline between Wentworth Junction and West Silkstone Junction. This incline was about 3.5 miles long at about 1 in 40. Typically coal trains of 60+ wagons arrived from Wath pulled by an O4 with either an O4 or an L1 as a banker. No. 2395 would then come off its siding and push from behind the banker. Once at West Silkestone Junction, No. 2395 would then return to Wentworth Junction. The train would continue to the main Sheffield to Manchester main line at Penistone, whilst the other banker would usually remain until Dunford Bridge. Previous to No. 2395's arrival, two O4s were used as extra bankers, to give a total of three bankers!

    The Silkstone tunnels were notoriously bad for air quality. The Garratt being at the back would suffer the worst. Respirators were tried which took air from near rail-level, however the loco crews objected to sharing equipment, and the trial stopped.

    https://railway-photography.smugmug.com/LNERSteam/Gresley-Locomotives/Gresley-Tender-engines/GresleyBeyer-Peacock-U1-Class/

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    Gresley+Beyer-Peacock U1 Class Garratt ('The Wath Banker') - Railway-Photography

    railway-photography.smugmug.com
    railway photographs from the last 100 years
    The water was very soft, so a protective layer of scale could not build up in No. 2395's tubes. Hence corrosion was a problem, and she was retubed in 1926. In 1927 the firebox was cracked. In 1928, further firebox corrosion was found. A chemical solution was tried from 1928, and this appears to have helped the corrosion problems. However, she still spent 9 months of 1930 out of service for reasons unknown.

    No. 2395 was renumbered 9999 in March 1946, and then became 69999 with Nationalisation. Despite these number changes, she kept the small 2395 cabside numberplates until withdrawal.

    In 1949, it was realised that a new boiler would be required soon. However, the forthcoming electrification scheme of the Manchester, Sheffield, and Wath lines meant that this would only be economic if alternative work could be found. She was also tried out on the Lickey Incline in 1949-50 and again in 1955. Despite conversion to oil burning in 1952, neither trial was a success. No. 69999 was withdrawn in December 1955 with a final mileage of 425,213 miles. Official accounts describe the final withdrawal being due to the failure of the oil conversion, and widespread unpopularity amongst engine crews. However, anecdotal reports also talk of the London Midland Region's loading gauge restrictions and resulting platform damage. No. 69999 was scrapped at Doncaster.



    Thanks to

    The London & North Eastern Railway Encyclopedia
     

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