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Gauges

Discussion in 'Railway Operations M.I.C' started by 22A, Jul 28, 2008.

  1. Reading General

    Reading General Part of the furniture

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    i always thought that ships had boats on them but boats can't have ships, this being the definition...truth is all these distinctions are vague and flexible.
     
  2. ZBmer

    ZBmer New Member

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    Think I'd go with the term adopted by the particular railway I was visiting. There's very little more galling to someone working on a (to them) narrow gauge line, when they get a free and unwanted lecture on its miniature status. Or vice versa.

    For instance the RH&DR uses the word miniature in its literature. Though I'd class their diesel loco's as narrow-gauge, their opinion counts more than mine. Kirklees, also a 15" line, calls itself narrow gauge. Fine; that's what it is, then.

    Roger
     
  3. tuffer5552

    tuffer5552 Member

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    Good rule of thumb i found is that a ship leans out when it turns and a boat leans in.
     

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