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Fitting Vac Cylinders to a wagon

Discussion in 'Carriage & Wagon M.I.C.' started by Ploughman, Sep 29, 2016.

  1. Ploughman

    Ploughman Well-Known Member

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    Task for today was to remove a vac cylinder from a Grampus wagon and refit a newly overhauled one.
    Once I had the thing disconnected, undone, burnt off the trunnion nuts and on the floor no problem.
    Putting it back a bit more tricky trying to line up the bolt holes and fitting new bolts, but we got there.

    Then once I was on the floor on my back under the cylinder refitting the valve and hose, I noticed a slight problem.
    The valve was on the outer side of the cylinder and the hose would not reach, no problem, got a longer hose.
    That however was at its limit and would rub on the piston.
    Strings would need adjusting as well.

    Questions -
    Can a cylinder fitted with the valve on the outer side of the cylinder work correctly?
    Can it be rectified by fitting a longer hose?
    Or do I need to take the whole cylinder off again, turn it 180 degrees and refit with the valve in the centre of the wagon?
     
  2. Steve

    Steve Resident of Nat Pres Friend

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    Leave the reservoir on the trunnions. unbolt the cylinder from the reservoir and rotate to the desired position. Ensure o ring is OK and bolt it back up. Simples.
     
  3. Ken_R

    Ken_R New Member

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    +1
     
  4. Ploughman

    Ploughman Well-Known Member

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    Thanks
    Will try that.
     
  5. Ken_R

    Ken_R New Member

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    Just to add that when we overhaul a unit, I will often keep the 'rolling ring', cut it to length, and then use it to form a 'new' O Ring that sits beneath the filler that screws into the water tank on the roof of a carriage.

    I think we get two O Rings from one (21") 'ring'. I cut the ring 'square' with a hacksaw and then wrap it around a 'filler' and mark it about 1/4" short. Cut again. The ends are then joined by using one of the better Super Glues. Can't remember which one we use but it cures in 14 seconds.

    It's a two man job. One to hold the rubber so that the 'moulding marks' align, and another to apply the adhesive to the cut end(s).

    When fitting, we apply Rubber Grease to the O Ring to minimize any strain on the joint. The red stuff that used to come in a small sachet with car brake cylinder overhaul kits, but which is now available in tubs.

    We've done a couple this year and have not seen any signs of them failing. They are certainly better than the 'life expired' examples that were removed as 'originals'.
     
    Wenlock likes this.
  6. Ploughman

    Ploughman Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Oct 6, 2016
  7. Steve

    Steve Resident of Nat Pres Friend

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  8. Ploughman

    Ploughman Well-Known Member

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    About half an hour after we made it.
     

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